Saturday, October 1, 2011

CIA Operative Raymond Davis Arrested In Colorado After Parking Spot Fight

Editor's Note:  Apparently, Raymond Davis is not a pseudonym.


Raymond Davis Was Released From Pakistani Prison In January

HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo. -- The CIA operative who was freed from a Pakistani prison after the U.S. paid $2.3 million in blood money was arrested Saturday morning in Highlands Ranch after he fought with another man over a parking spot, CALL7 Investigators have learned.

Raymond Davis was arrested outside an Einstein Bagels at the Town Center at Highlands Ranch, at Highlands Ranch Parkway and South Broadway, sources close to the investigation told Call7 Investigator Tony Kovaleski.  Sources told Kovaleski that Davis and another man with him had been arguing with a third man about a parking spot when the verbal argument escalated into a physical altercation.

In the argument, Davis was the aggressor, reliable sources said. The 50-year-old victim was treated at the scene and released.  Deputies with the Douglas County Sheriff's Office were called around 8 a.m.  Davis was taken into custody on misdemeanor charges of third-degree assault and disorderly conduct. He was released after posting $1,750 in bond.  Davis informed responding deputies who he was and said that the press would be following this and would appreciate it if authorities kept his arrest out of the press, according to sources.  The Douglas County Sherriff's Office treated his arrest like any other case, but once they confirmed his identity, the sheriff's office had to follow protocol and notify Colorado's highest ranking law enforcement office, the Colorado Department of Public Safety.  The sheriff's office is still working on a report.Davis was jailed in a Pakistani prison on Jan. 27, after he shot and killed two Pakistani men as he sat in his car.  Davis, a 36-year-old Virginia native, said he shot the two men in self-defense as they tried to rob him in late January.  He claimed the two men attacked him as he drove through a busy Lahore neighborhood.  He was charged with murder and then released after the families of the two Pakistanis he killed pardoned him in exchange for compensation or "blood money."  The payment of "blood money" to the families, sanctioned under Pakistani law, was considered by Davis' attorney as the best way to get out of the crisis.  The killings triggered a fresh wave of anti-American sentiment in Pakistan and were testing an alliance seen as key to defeating al-Qaida and ending the war in Afghanistan.  The tensions were especially sharp between the CIA and Pakistan's powerful Inter Services Intelligence, its spy agency, which said it did not know Davis was operating in the country.  One ISI official said the agency had backed the "blood money" deal as way of soothing tensions.  The United States initially described Davis as either a U.S. consular or embassy official, and claimed he had diplomatic immunity.  But officials later acknowledged he was working for the CIA, confirming suspicions that had aired in the Pakistani media. 7NEWS confirmed Davis owns a security company called Hyperion Protective Consultants, which is contracted to do work for the U.S. government.



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